Comments or suggestions: Gerard Van der Leun

America

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Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Art

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Books

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Criticism

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Culture

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Humor and Satire

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Innovations

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Insight

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Internet

Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Law

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Literature

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Moving Images

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

People

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Photography

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Poems

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Politics

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Quote Bank

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Science

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Space

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Style

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

Terror

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->

War

Think Links
Intelliseek's BlogPulse Newswire

FROM THE COMMENTS: "Samurai warriors had a philosophy, 'ken tai i-chi' or attack and defend are the same thing. It is the highest form of defense to cut down your enemy before he launches his attack. Many schools of swordsmanship, particularly Jigen Ryu, had no defensive techniques in their curriculum."

table test no line breaks
Table test no line breaks
NPR's TranscriptMy comments
Steve Inskeep: As always, the news in Iraq may affect the campaign. In the last day, that news has included a U.S. offfensive in Falluja and a bombing in Baghdad. The bombers killed six people inside the Green Zone. That's a fortified area surrounded by concrete barriers and razor wire. It is where the Americans have run their operations since coming to Baghdad. Journalist William Langewiesche has spent time in the Green Zone as a reporter for the Atlantic Monthly. he says that from the start of the occupation, security concerns have isolated American decision makers from the country around them.Yup, Mr. Inskeep, tell how you want your conclusion to affect the campaign right upfront, even if the logic of the piece isn't well thought out, of broad scope and with deep insight, or particularly useful to voters.
WL: It is a highly fortified area that is mostly park and monumental buildings. Saddam's various palaces are in there, too -- one of which now is the center of American operations. This is not a military base, it is a civilian base protected by the military, but it has many of those cultural oddities that being somewhere far away yet eating all American food and Americans talking primarily to Americans. In other words, let me convey at the outset that I believe people who live here must be out of touch. Otherwise they'd be eating local fare. I also want to convey that Americans here who are trying to help don't come into contact with the Iraqis who, you will remember, are actually running Iraq now.
SI: How did concerns about security affect the attitudes of people inside the Green Zone? As if you expected them to want something other than to be secure while they were here. Couldn't you have started off with a more focused question like, who do you suppose has put coalition members at risk? Why do ou suppose Zarqawi wants coalition members at risk?
WL: Well, the Green Zone has always been all about security. As the insurgency has grown in Iraq, those concerns have magnified, for good reason. And the Green Zone has become the fortress. Damn right it's a good reason. But keep things in perspective. Baghdad may be the biggest city, but Iraq is a big country. You have to be careful not to let focus on the center of Iraq to draw attention from all the positive that is at work in Iraq.
SI: When you go back a year or so, did the Americans overreact to the security problems? Where did you get these questions?
WL: No. I don't think they overreacted to it. I think that it was institutionally inevitable the United States will retreat into fortified compounds. I think the mistake that was made was not to realize that about our ourselves. We need to think about where we want those fortified compounds to be. And what they look like to the locals. To the Iraqis it has always looked like fear of them. Disdain of them. The other effect is that it simply isolated the Americans from Iraq. Of course they didn't overreact. They did what was required to protect he lives of people that did not deserve to be blown up by suicide bombers or beheaded by those who don't want Iraq to become a free, democratic society.
SI: Did they then make up unrealistic plans for Iraq? Are you implying that mistakes were made because people are obliged to protect themselves while trying to rescusitate Iraq?
WL: Yes. Of course. Totally. It's hard to know where even to begin. You can pretty much look at the entire product of the CPA -- the Coalition Provisional Authority -- and say that it was unrealistic. I can think of attempts to regulate the traffic. There was an attempt basically to impose a Maryland State Traffic Code on Baghdad. Some of the plans undoubtedly were unrealistic, but remember that Iraq had been systematically throttled for decades. It had no infrastructure or resilient educated middle class to draw on.
SI: Would you say that these are mostly well-intentioned people? People who thought they could impose American systems on Iraq and it would just work? That was the idea?I repeat, where did you get these questions?
WL: Of course. I think we have been blinded by success and power into thinking that we are rich and powerful because of our own attributes. Well, to some extent that may be true. But there is also an element of luck. Chance. History. Of course they were well-intentioned. Remember, they were also temporary. The idea has always been to turn the government of the Iraqis over Iraqis.
SI: Could there have been a different last year and a half? If the Americans had simply said we're not going to hide in fortified compounds. We're going to move about the country to make sure we understand the country and accept that some American civilians as well as soldiers are going to geet killed?Is chronic compression of timeline a disease amongst such hosts? They seem incapable of conceiving that you can't go back and relive the past. You have to do now what can be done now.
WL: I think at this stage it is much too late for that. If you say a year and a half, yes. I mean, don't forget, when the United States first came in, though we were not greated with flowers, as people apparently in the White House expected, we were not greeted with aggressive hostility. We were greeted with a question mark. There were other things going wrong. If we could have addressed those, sure, we would not be in the situation we are in now. Look, this is not just terrorism -- foreign terrorism -- sure, that is an element... something that we could not have controlled. Far more important, this is a wide-spread and very popular insurgency against the American presence. And it's the insurgency that matters now. That is what is known as a stupid-ass question that brings to mind the British in the Revolutionary War lined up column by column to be mowed down by the colonists. What sensible government is going to put its citizens into harms way unless it is absolutely necessary.
SI: We've been talking to William Langewiesche... Or, "I've been leading William Langewiesche on to say what I want him to say in a most useless and non-productive direction...


Publications of Note
Online locations of Periodicals
Continue reading ->

Blogs of Note
A few links to keep in mind.
Continue reading ->

Aliens Cause Global Warming
A lecture by Michael Crichton -- January 17, 2003
Continue reading ->
G2E Media GmbH

SIDELINES

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By Mail: Gerard Van der Leun | 6616-D Clark Road #176 | Paradise, CA 95969

In the absence of sincere belief in the practice and presence of Our Lord, playing dress-up starts to feel silly.

Instead, that irrepressible sense of awe is transferred to, for instance, high-class restaurants,
with the candles on the table and the reverent “servers” chanting, almost liturgically, items from the menu. For the religious impulse will never go away, with its longing for a certain elevation and tone. If not foodie, every man and woman born will find something holy, and be outraged by blasphemies against it. The codes of speech and gesture that now govern our public behaviour are “spilt religion” of an obvious kind. Those who dare breach them are the new Infidels. Among the new Infidels : Essays in Idleness


The center may hold in France but it is unlikely to hold for long.

The long and agonized effort rearguard effort to explain away the challenge posed by Brexit, Trumpism and now France
as just the result of yahoos hearing themselves hog calling have been one futile exercise in self delusion. There's a hole in the bottom of the Titanic and the water has reached F Deck and now gurgling up the staircase. It's time for the passengers in first class to seriously consider they may actually actually drown before the night is out. Sneering comedy skits on the Daily Show, Full Frontal, and Last Week Tonight won't cut it any more. SOS


Thank You, Internal-Combustion Engine, for Cleaning up the Environment

deadhorsenyc.jpg

We complain a lot about air pollution today, but there were 200,000 horses in New York City, at the beginning of the 20th century defecating everywhere.
And when you walked around in New York City, you were breathing pulverized horse manure—a much worse pollutant, than the exhausts of automobiles. Indeed in the United States, the automobile was considered the solution to the horse problem because pulverized horse manure carried a lot of deadly pathogens. - - Foundation for Economic Education


Please, God, Stop Chelsea Clinton from Whatever She Is Doing

Unkind as it is to say, reading anything by Chelsea Clinton—tweets, interviews, books—
is best compared to taking in spoonfuls of plain oatmeal that, periodically, conceal a toenail clipping. Take the introduction to It’s Your World (Get Informed! Get Inspired! Get Going!). It’s harmless, you think. “My mom wouldn’t let me have sugary cereal growing up (more on that later),” writes Chelsea, “so I improvised, adding far more honey than likely would have been in any honeyed cereals.” That’s the oatmeal—and then comes the toenail: I wrote a letter to President Reagan when I was five to voice my opposition to his visit to the Bitburg cemetery in Germany, because Nazis were buried there. I didn’t think an American president should honor a group of soldiers that included Nazis. President Reagan still went, but at least I had tried in my own small way.

Ah, yes, that reminds me of when I was four and I wrote to Senator John Warner about grain tariffs, arguing that trade barriers unfairly decreased consumer choice. | Vanity Fair

When Women Campaigned to Prohibit "That Newfangled, Abominable, Heathenish Liquor Called COFFEE"

Coffee, so insist the Buxome Good-Women,

renders the men of England “as Lean as Famine, as Rivvel’d as Envy, or an old meager Hagg over-ridden by an Incubus. They come from it with nothing moist but their snotty Noses, nothing stiffe but their Joints, nor standing but their Ears.” These charges drew a response in the form of the “Mens Answer to the Womens Petition Against Coffee, Vindicating Their own Performances, and the Vertues of that Liquor, from the Undeserved Aspersions lately cast upon them by their SCANDALOUS PAMPHLET.” - -
The Coffee Revolt of 1674



Who are we to judge the way Russians feel about bears?

In Russia, Bear Eats YOU. Well, Actually, He Eats Your Cookies – BSBFB
Americans have fallen into a dumb habit of calling brave people dumb. They post pictures of Darwin every time some misadventure befalls any person who’s doing anything other than cowering in mom’s basement. Who are we to judge the way Russians feel about bears? For all we know, a gigantic bear with arms like a furry Schwarzenegger holding five paring knives is like a squirrel to them. Nothing to be worried about. Maybe they’d call an exterminator if they found a bear in the attic, but other than that, it’s live and let live.


These are popping up in a town that is 99%+ white and affluent.

wedelude.jpg
A more accurate sign:

We Believe

Black Lives Are Props

No Human Is Illegal (unless they’re trespassing on my property)

Love Is Code For Hating The Right People

Women’s Rights Don’t Count For Muslims

Science Of Race And Sex Isn’t Real

Water Is Life (check out my in-ground pool)

Injustice Anywhere But Against Whites Is A Threat To Justice Everywhere

We Testify Under Penalty Of Exile | Goodbye, America (in a photo)

The Scorecard so far? Let's go to the video tape!

How’s everything else looking?

The economy? Looking good.

North Korea? Looks like China is on our side. Good sign.

Syria? Those Tomahawk missiles were downright “Presidential”

Illegal Immigration? Already down 70% from Trump’s persuasion alone.

Supreme Court? Gorsuch is respected and qualified, even if you don’t like his ways.

Healthcare? No one said it would be easy, but the focus and energy are in place to get something done eventually.

Tax reform? Too slow for the country’s taste, but observers expect something good to come out of it. That’s why business optimism is high.

Climate change? Anecdotally, it seems to me that the debate has evolved from mindless bullying of non-believers to a lower confidence in both the climate models and the economic models (which are not science). That seems like a step toward clarity.

Generally speaking, if your critics are reduced to complaining about what might be in your tax returns, you already won. -- The Air Comes Out of the Anti-Trump Balloon | Scott Adams' Blog


"Trying to squeeze blood from a rotten turnip." [Bumped]

chelsea-clinton-variety-cover-promo-575x743.jpg

Chelsea Clinton’s Cheerleading Cult Trying to squeeze blood from a rotten turnip:
Welcome to the liberal media’s manufacturing of “cool.” Leather jacket? Check. Overzealous airbrushing? Check. Humanizing grin? Check. Democratic establishment pedigree? Checkity-check-check. This is just the latest attempt by The Media Resistance to make Chelsea Clinton a thing.


Outrage du Jour

This fresh terrorist shooting in Paris is going to knock the media's non-coverage of the Fresno terrorist shooting right off of the bottom of page D23. I lied. The Fresno shooting isn't on D23 either. More details to come as the media buries them and teams of forensic news archeologists sift through the artifacts of this soon-to-be buried non-event. Ace of Spades HQ

The Japanese: Nuked too much or not enough?

Sumo Wrestlers Enjoy Cherry Blossom Season
ajapansumo.jpg
"Are we not men? No! We are Sumo!"


The Elements of Bureaucratic Style

The term “officer-involved shooting” is a perfect example of bureaucratic speech:
It invariably is paired with an active verb (“an officer-involved shooting occurred”) and yet the entire purpose of the construction is to imbue the scene with passivity. Police did not kill anyone; a shooting just occurred and it happened to involve officers. There is no actor in an officer-involved shooting, and not even any real actions. We don’t even technically know who was shot, only that an officer was somehow involved. An entire syntactical arrangement consisting of a subject (“police”), a verb (“shot”), and an object (“a civilian”) are transmuted into a noun (“shooting”) with a compound adjective (“officer-involved”) attached. It’s almost as if nothing took place at all. - - Longreads


Jihadi and drone speech are deadly because they do not require complete messages to guide them.

Apparently there are ideas, like the incantations that Coulter is likely to utter
that are dangers in themselves, which summon devils from the vasty deep and provoke an involuntarily reaction in whoever is unfortunate to hear them. .... What the Antifa, Howard Dean and the Venezuelan regime call contemporary "hate speech" is code for a culture to rival their own. They fear culture not speech. What makes it so dangerous is it dares to do what the progressives have done themselves. Critical speech could be tolerated for so long as it lacked a sense of identity but it became an existential threat with the first stirrings of self-consciousness behind the words. - - Skynet


If you want more people working, make it simpler to hire them.

Exempt more small businesses from regulations.
Double the exemption numbers. That is, if a regulation stipulates that it applies only to firms with ten or more employees, make that number 20. If 9 make it 18. I would go further, and double exemptions up to 99 employees; certainly, up to 50. There are a lot of businesses that might expand were the regulations not so expensive and/or oppressive. This simple exemption would let tens of thousands of firms hire more people, and would cost not very much. It could be passed in a week by Congress, but a Presidential Executive Order could accomplish a lot. - – Jerry Pournelle


The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI

You can’t just look inside a deep neural network to see how it works.
A network’s reasoning is embedded in the behavior of thousands of simulated neurons, arranged into dozens or even hundreds of intricately interconnected layers. The neurons in the first layer each receive an input, like the intensity of a pixel in an image, and then perform a calculation before outputting a new signal. These outputs are fed, in a complex web, to the neurons in the next layer, and so on, until an overall output is produced. Plus, there is a process known as back-propagation that tweaks the calculations of individual neurons in a way that lets the network learn to produce a desired output. - - MIT Technology Review


What became of America's Drive-Thru Fotomat?

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Once upon a time, in an era when mankind had to wait an unimaginable 24 hours to see how holiday snaps and selfies had turned out, there was -- the trusty Fotomat. A bright and compact little kiosk easily recognizable by its pyramid-shaped gold-coloured roof, usually positioned in a large parking lot outside a strip mall, at its peak in the early 80s, there were over 4,000 Fotomats throughout North America. - - Messy Nessy
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"We got black and a white actor in the commercial, and they're gay with an asian baby. No one can complain!"

There is no longer a mass market.
The white consumer population is falling. Companies need to sell more to minorities to maintain growth. Minorities no longer want to be token add-ons to white advertising or white policies, they want their own. Blacks want black ads and policies that favor blacks, Spanish-speaking people want Spanish language programming. Advertisers tried race-mixing. This is interpreted as a conscious decision to force race mixing on the Alt-Right, but it might be a way to increase diversity (we got black and a white actor in the commercial, and they're gay with an asian baby. No one can complain!). That backfired and more people complained, plus the sheer number of them caused more people to notice that ads are social programming. - - Peak Diversity: The Mass Market Is Dead


Chelsea Clinton Gives Advice on How Millennial Women Can Be As Successful As Her

Clinton's jobs have apparently valued her quite well.
Clinton was first hired at 23 by top consulting firm McKinsey & Company, earning a $120,000 annualsalary. She was their youngest hire and made as much as fellow employeeswith MBA degrees, even though she only had a bachelor's in history. In 2006, she moved on to work at hedge fund Avenue Capital Group, run by high-powered Democratic billionaire Marc Lasry. Lasry has contributed more than $460,000 to Democratic causes since the 1990's. Most infamously, Clinton was hired by NBC as a special correspondent to the tuneof $600,000 annually, or approximately $26,724 for every minute she was on air. Among her most probing interviews was her grilling of the Geico gecko. - - Freebeacon


Dumb Birds of North America

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Seadull If you live near the coast, these sons of bitches are everywhere.
Also, if you live near a garbage dump. Gulls literally don’t care whether they’re eating a small marine invertebrate from the ocean or a rancid french-fry from the trash. Yeah. They enjoy eating garbage and shitting everywhere. Fun bird fact: The gulls in Alfred Hitchcock’s movie The Birds were fed a mix of wheat and whiskey so they would attack a children’s birthday party.Field Guide to Dumb Birds of North America


A horse is a horse, of course, of course, And no one can talk to a horse of course.

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Mister Ed's Final Resting Place – Tahlequah, Oklahoma Alan Young, who played Wilbur Post,
the only person to whom Mister Ed would speak on the show, says that Harvester actually died accidentally following a shot of tranquilizer in California and was cremated, his ashes spread around by his trainer, Lester Hilton. Young says the horse buried in Oklahoma was a different palomino horse named Pumpkin, who died in 1979. Pumpkin was used for publicity shots for the show, and took up the mantle of Mister Ed after Harvester died, but never played the role on television. A third story has Harvester dying in California and being buried in Oklahoma.


Just when we think we're out, they pull us back in.

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They don’t call it the “Stupid Party” for nothing. Republicans ran 11 – that’s right, one short of a dozen – candidates against a good looking 30 year old Anyone But Trump Democrat; what kind of a strategy is that? MOTUS A.D.:

The women of the Hell’s Angels were bad, brassy, bombshell ‘old ladies’

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“One thing about the Angels that I found fascinating,
and something I’d never given much thought to before I started photographing them, was the role that the women played,” he said. “The girls weren’t there in chains, or against their will or anything. They had to want that life if they were going to be accepted by the Angels. These guys were kings of the road. I don’t think they ever felt they had to look around for girls. Girls would come to them, and they would take their pick. And then they’d tell them where to sit and what to do.” - - TimeLine



The Income Tax Then... and Now

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-- Via the every valuable Doug Ross @ Journal

The population of addicts is like the population of deer.

It is highest in rustic places with access to urban supplies.
Missouri’s heroin problem is worst in the rural counties near St. Louis. New Hampshire’s is worst in the small cities and towns an hour or so away from the drug markets of Massachusetts: Lawrence, Lowell, and Boston..... The implicit accusation is that only now that whites are involved have racist authorities been roused to act. This is false in two ways. First, authorities have not been roused to act. Second, when they do, they will have epidemiological, and not just tribal, grounds for doing so. A plague afflicting an entire country, across ethnic groups, is by definition more devastating than a plague afflicting only part of it. American Carnage by Christopher Caldwell | Articles | First Things


Why No Civility Is Possible Today

When spelled out, what we have today in this country is an unbridgeable disagreement about what the family is.
Misunderstand the family and all its coherent complexities, what follows is that nothing else will go right. We have no common judgment about the transcendent meaning of our lives. One division maintains, with no real proof, that man has no given nature. Logically and politically, step by step, consequences, that are not accidental, follow. We legalize contraception, then, when that does not work, abortion, euthanasia, fetal experimentation, homosexual marriages and adoptions. We can even decide if we are male or female. A “family” is configured as we wish it to be. These practices have all become “rights” under positive law. They are systematically enforced. No criticism of them is allowed, no matter how scientifically or reasonably based it may be. - Crisis Magazine


"Not a racial issue but a religious or cultural one"

With regard to the Islamic presence in Europe,
do we need reminding of the wars in the Balkans, of recent memory, in which Christians and Muslims in Bosnia and beyond, killed each other in a frenzy of hatred and “ethnic cleansing”? Do we need reminding that all of those doing the killing, on both the Christian and Muslim side, were impeccably white? Do we need reminding that such ethnic cleansing has been part of the demographic dynamic of that region ever since the Muslims first invaded centuries earlier? Do we need reminding that the very word “balkanization” entered the language because of such enmity between peoples and the destructive fragmentation that is its consequence? The point is not whether Islamic immigration to Europe is a major threat to peace—obviously it is—it’s that Islam is a multiracial religion as Christianity is a multiracial religion. It’s about a clash of cultures, not a clash of races. In such a clash of cultures, a black Christian and a white Christian are one side of the divide, and a black Muslim and a white Muslim are on the other. It might well be the case that the influx of Muslims into Europe is leading to the balkanization of Europe with all the harmful consequences that this entails; however, it’s not a racial issue but a religious or cultural one. Is the West Lost Forever? - The Imaginative Conservative


Stephen King's Stranger Love Songs

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by Butcher Billy on Behance

Poof-Berries

Liberalism is the secular religion for the girls, mostly single white girls.
They try to cobble together a coalition of hues for political reasons, but it is mostly a religion for cat ladies and the women who intend to be cat ladies. Buckley Conservatism is trying to fish in those waters, but that hole is all fished out and take that however you like. - -The Z Blog


The Heart asks Pleasure -- first --
And then -- Excuse from Pain --
And then -- those little Anodynes
That deaden suffering --

And then -- to go to sleep --
And then -- if it should be
The will of its Inquisitor
The privilege to die --

-
- Emily Dickinson



America is not Weimar Germany. It is not even 1960’s America.

The days of hard men enforcing ideological discipline on the streets are long over.
The days of disaffected youth upsetting the social order are also past. Ricky Vaughn did more for the disaffected with his twitter account than any of these guys playing make believe on the streets of Berkeley. The bros had a good time beating up on the punks from Antifa and that’s not a terrible result in itself, but it is not the Spartacist uprising. If there’s any lesson here at all it is that in the current crisis, the old tactics are more for theater and entertainment than advancing a political agenda. Going on campus to harass Charles Murray is not changing minds and it is not intended to change minds. It’s just something to do in order to show off to friends. Its bored children coloring on the walls, even though they know mom with be pissed. Since mom is not going to give them up for adoption over it, the act is just pointless, risk-free theaterAlt-LARP | The Z Blog
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Only Way to End North Korea’s Nuclear Weapons Program Is to ‘End the North’

“I would be very wary of Chinese assurances that they’re going to help persuade North Korea to give up the nuclear weapons program.”
“They’ve said that for 25 years, and they haven’t done a single thing to materially impede North Korea’s nuclear program. I think further discussions with North Korea, further efforts to pressure North Korea, are basically a waste of time. The way to end the North’s nuclear program is to end the North – merge it, reunify it with South Korea.” - - John Bolton


The Most American Thing You've Never Heard Of: Tanking

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There’s a new way to get your kicks in rural Nebraska.
The uniquely Nebraskan water “sport,” tanking, is like tubing on steroids. Groups of three to six people comfortably float down stream, all held buoyant by giant metal tanks. Large livestock tanks outfitted with seating and coolers carry passengers on calm waterways. The stream provides the motion, and a paddle on board can gently change course. Because of the tank’s cumbersome and circular shape, they bob up and down and rotate like a slow-motion tilt-o-whirl.- - Gear Junkie


Don't Force Our Hand

Look, the Hard Right has no desire to fight in the streets.
No sane person wants to live in a society where there is constant, realistic expectations of ongoing bloodshed. That is why we advocate the removal of undesirables. We do not want to kill anyone. We want them to simply go away. Go home. Go back where you came from. Just leave us alone. In fact, if there is an overarching theme to the Hard Right position, it is that we just want to be left alone to live our lives as we see fit. Unfortunately, the left has horribly misread the situation. Rather than realize the superiority of our position, they have chosen to bring the fight to us. They have mistaken our forbearance to this point for weakness. That is dead wrong. It is not that we are not capable. It is that we do not want open conflict. But if we are forced into a corner, all hell is going to break loose, and the left is not going to like the result. - Men Of The West


The biggest obstacle to ensuring the 10,000 Year Clock actually lasts 10,000 years is

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the obstacle it seeks to overcome.
“When you start thinking about building something that lasts that long, the real problem is not decay and corrosion, or even the power source. The real problem is people,” Danny Hillis wrote in Wired in 1995. “If something becomes unimportant to people, it gets scrapped for parts; if it becomes important, it turns into a symbol and must eventually be destroyed. The only way to survive over the long run is to be made of materials large and worthless, like Stonehenge and the Pyramids, or to become lost. The Dead Sea Scrolls managed to survive by remaining lost for a couple millennia. Now that they’ve been located and preserved in a museum, they’re probably doomed. I give them two centuries — tops.” Forever Now — Real Life


How dangerous and unstable would Asia become without the Seventh Fleet?

The Navy points to two different threats.
The first is China, which has territorial claims against most of its neighbors. Taiwan comes immediately to mind, of course, but the Chinese government is also disputing ownership of the oil-rich Spratly Islands with Vietnam and the Philippines. If North Korea were to collapse, moreover, the Chinese Army could take over its territory before South Korea or the U.S. had time to intervene. China is building a very large deepwater fleet—the first in its history. (South Korea and Japan are similarly increasing their naval power.) Thus far, this Chinese fleet seldom moves far from China’s territorial waters, something that surprises the Seventh Fleet leadership. The lack of a high-seas tradition, perhaps? - - George Washington Patrols the Pacific


The first line of a paper she published has a similar error in the first line -- one that would disqualify a person from being my assistant:

"The consumption of Nollywood films in the United States is a site of complex translational engagements and a location of disjunctured processes that illuminate how Diasporas are imagined, created and performed. "Advice Goddess Blog



Leftists are r-strategist migrant psychologies, programmed to crave being surrounded by the strange and the foreign.

The only thing is, given those urges to be surrounded by the foreign, they have to choose –

is it better to migrate out to some third world shithole, or is it better to stay put and import that foreign quality which they are programmed to want to be surrounded by? Even as it is blatantly clear that Islam is death, and their migrant policies will only fuck up the entire continent for decades at least, they cannot deny their urges. They need that foreign component. So they import it. - Liberal and Conservative Politics



"A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within."

It wasn't Brexit or Trump or even Putin who unmoored the world. Gramsci did. Unmoored it so thoroughly that public debate over culture now has descended to the level of whether McDonald's is guilty of cultural appropriation by offering Szechuan sauce with its Chicken Nuggets. The Google which can remember Cesar Chavez has pointedly forgotten Easter. - - Lost

Even sucking the lifeblood out of Millennials is not enough to feed the greedy academic beast.

The bright new idea – one embraced by that commie from New England, that other commie from New England who tricked her college into thinking she was an Indian, and that firewater aficionado who lost the election – is “free college.”
Let’s set aside the fact that community college exists to give everyone the opportunity to get some higher education; today, it’s job is to occupy high school students for a few extra years by intermittently teaching them the things the incompetence of unionized teachers ensured they didn’t learn in public high schools. The “free college” idea offers those of us who have already paid for our own education the opportunity to pony up for someone else’s. Academia Is Our Enemy So We Should Help It Commit Suicide - Kurt Schlichter


"Nothing like hanging out with the poor people....how's your carbon footprint these days Obama?"

A picture perfect moment! Barack and Michelle Obama pose on billionaire David Geffen's superyacht during day out with Oprah, Bruce Springsteen and Tom Hanks in French Polynesia Barack and Michelle Obama were guests on David Geffen's 454ft superyacht Rising Sun on Friday Oprah, Tom Hanks and Bruce Springsteen were also on board the stunning $300million vessel The Obamas have been holidaying at the Brando resort in French Polynesia for the past month Since leaving the White House, they have also visited Palm Springs, Hawaii and toured the Caribbean[HT: Althouse]

Exploring the Spiritual World of the 19th Century

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At some point, possibly by accident when the glass-plate negative was heated to receive a coat of varnish, a crack appeared in the upper half of the plate.
Gardner pulled a single print and then discarded the plate, so only one such portrait exists. The crack seems to trace the path of Wilkes’ bullet. Some saw it is a symbol of the Union reunited through Lincoln’s own body. - - Smithsonian


"How does my hair look," she asked before blowing out the candles on her 117th birthday cake last year.

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Italian Emma Morano, last known survivor of 19th century, dies at 117
Morano's death, at the age of 117 years and 137 days, means there is no one living known to have been born before 1900. Her first love died in World War I, but she married later and left her violent husband just before the Second World War and shortly after the death in infancy of her only son. That was 30 years before divorce became legal in Italy. In an interview with AFP last year, she put her longevity down to her diet. "I eat two eggs a day, and that's it. And cookies. But I do not eat much because I have no teeth."


Parent Failure

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This from AD reader Jewel: Last night my youngest girl wanted to dye Easter eggs with the Boy. I was to butt out and let her run the egg show.
I guess she figured that the Boy, being all of 6 years, had pretty much mastered the egg dunk and decided to move him up a level to glue, paint, glitter, googly eyes, and felt. The results were predictable, and were a prelude to a tantrum. But more interesting is the Girl's egg art: The text reads: "Do you ever cook something in the microwave but it's still cold in the middle but you just keep eating it because entropy is unavoidable and the universe is filled with casual and callous destruction?" Clearly, I have failed as a parent.
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[Bumped] The law of trespass, which is common throughout the civilised world is at the basis of this hoo-hah.

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Hard cases make bad law. The law of trespass is an essential safeguard for us all.
The doctor had no right to refuse to leave and the ejection was lawful. If more force than necessary was applied, then that is a case for assault and battery, causing actual or grievous bodily harm. But the court will have to take into account the resistance of the doctor during the ejection, as he had no right of refusal to leave.
Having said all that, the damage to the reputation of the airline in provoking this incident through crass management practices will be costly and it serves them right. But don't knock the law of trespass if you own a dwelling or a cabbage patch. Some asshole might decide to occupy it and then you need the law to undecide him. Comment here by Posted by: Frank P


OUCH! Now that's going to leave a mark.

If mediocrity can ever be said to shine, then it shines from these pages.
The writer, though a journalist, has no literary ability whatsoever. He writes entirely in clichés, there is not a single arresting thought in over 400 pages, wit and even humor are entirely absent, and he seems unable to use a metaphor, almost always tired to begin with, without mixing it ("We are likely to succumb on this if they get on their high horses and cry foul"). He has no powers of analysis and no sense of history; there is no plumbing his shallows. Unleashing Arrogance, Complacency, and Mediocrity


The final rule of Trump Club

is total detachment and living life the best you can. - - Jewel.



There is also the problem of moral grandiosity, perhaps seen in purest culture in Sweden.

There the government agreed to take 160,000 refugees or migrants from the Middle East in a single year (who did not want to claim asylum in Denmark, where the social security payments were lower).
The government did this because it (and its supporters) wanted Sweden to be an ethical superpower, a country responsible to and for the whole world, rather than to and for itself. Even these ethical narcissists soon realized, however, that if they proceeded in this fashion for, say, ten years (by no means an eternity in the history of a country), Sweden would have become, with the aid of a little family reunification and a higher birthrate, a semi–Middle Eastern country stuck in the Baltic, and they promptly closed the borders. In effect, they wanted to close the stable door before too many horses got in and ate up the supply of oats. - -Immigration Follies


In order to ascend to the rarefied world of the enlightened elite,

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you are required to affirm membership with insipid and inane identifying incantations.
You must be “awestruck” at the brilliance of obvious idiots and their ideas; “moved to tears” by ugly art, discordant music, unreadable novels, and tedious movies and theatre; fake laugh at the correct comics; cite approvingly propaganda masquerading as serious journalism, and praise the statesmanship of criminals. The elite unfortunately set the agenda for what the rest of the populace reads, views, and hears. The incantations are the elite’s public entrance exam; who knows what’s required privately. It’s undoubtedly unwholesome and disgusting, entangling its members in a vast, inescapable web: everyone kissing everyone else’s ass all at the same time. - - No Need to Ask


As Niccolo Machiavelli would've said, "You could look it up."

Let's review:
We burned up some aging cruise missiles, to erase an entire squadron of Assad's dwindling loyalist forces. (Bet your ass the other squadrons will bear that fate in mind from here on out.) We gave the surface Navy in the Med some good training and a great live FIREX. Putin has his pants around his ankles. Assad has a bloody nose. And Kim, Xi, and the mullahs in Teheran are leaning forward much more attentively when we speak. President Trump, and the US, are much more feared. Which means respected. Raconteur Report: Take A Breath


A grip. Get one.

Seriously, get a grip.
"TRUMP HAS CUCKED AND BETRAYED US ALL, THE END IS NIGH AND REICHSFUHRER KRISTOL REIGSN UBER ALLES!" doesn't make you look clever, or smart, or even sane. There is not only no need for you to announce your opinion of every zig and zag of foreign policy, but the unpredictability of the God-Emperor all but guarantees that you're going to look like a complete buffooon within days, if not hours, regardless of what you say. - - Vox Popoli: On vulgarity


In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function.

We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful. -- C.S. Lewis
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"This geriatric generation of white Democrats is the last of a dying breed "

Schadenfreude is on the horizon as we watch the Coalition of the Fringes come apart.
The 2020 presidential election is full of potential. There aren't any viable white candidates on the Democrat side. Bernie Sanders and creepy Joe Biden will be in nursing homes. Fauxcahontas, whose national appeal is reminiscent of Michael Dukakis', is the youngest known quantity of any significance and she'll be older than Trump was when he was elected the oldest president in US' history. The Audacious Epigone: Intersectionality


The first rule of Trump Club is: Don’t believe anything the Leftstream Media reports about him.

The seventh rule of Trump Club is: Trust YOUR instincts, and stay loyal to Trump. The media wants to sow dissension within Trump’s ranks and among his supporters. Refuse to take their bait. This doesn’t mean criticizing Trump is off-limits, but abandoning him to the jackals every time he makes a trivial move that violates some arcane alt-tenet will betray you, not Trump, as the untrustworthy party. - - The Rules Of Trump Club

Notes for a White Kid in University:An Introduction to the Blindingly Obvious

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A white man’s stick hut. We began building these things in 1137.

Euclidean geometry. Parabolic geometry. Hyperbolic geometry. Projective geometry. Differential geometry.
Calculus: Limits, continuity, differentiation, integration. Physical chemistry. Organic chemistry. Biochemistry. Classical mechanics. The indeterminacy principle. The wave equation. The Parthenon. The Anabasis. Air conditioning. Number theory. Romanesque architecture. Gothic architecture. Information theory. Entropy. Enthalpy. Every symphony ever written. Pierre Auguste Renoir. The twelve-tone scale. The mathematics behind it, twelfth root of two and all that. S-p hybrid bonding orbitals. The Bohr-Sommerfeld atom. The purine-pyrimidine structure of the DNA ladder. Single-sideband radio. All other radio. Dentistry. The internal-combustion engine. Turbojets. Turbofans. Doppler beam-sharpening. Penicillin. Airplanes. Surgery. The mammogram. The Pill. The condom. Polio vaccine. The integrated circuit. The computer. Football. Computational fluid dynamics. Tensors. The Constitution. Euripides, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Aeschylus, Homer, Hesiod. Glass. Rubber. Nylon. Skyscrapers. The piano. The harpsichord. Elvis. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. (OK, that’s nerve gas, and maybe we didn’t really need it.) Silicone. The automobile. Really weird stuff, like clathrates, Buckyballs, and rotaxanes. The Bible. Bug spray. Diffie-Hellman, public-key cryptography, and RSA. Et cetera at great length. | Fred On Everything


Frantic and angry and late is no way to go through life, son.

But that's exactly how the general public acts about everything all the time now.
They're lost. Almost everyone is traveling to a location they cannot name, but they seem hell bent to get to. Every milepost, sign, and touchstone that formerly directed their travel through life has been defaced or destroyed by vandals. They have map books that consist solely of dead ends on other planets. They started off edgy but by now they're entirely unglued. They will turn on anyone that comes into their line of sight. Even a Good Samaritan better watch out, as no amount of help is ever enough to turn back a clock. Anything resembling advice is seen as vilification, and even the mildest sort of criticism is an imperative to immediately drop the gloves. - - Sippican Cottage


In reality, it lies in desiring another to kiss your a– for having just before threatened to kick his;

for I have observed very accurately, that no one ever desires you to kick that which belongs to himself, nor offers to kiss this part in another.

It may likewise seem surprizing that in the many thousand kind invitations of this sort, which every one who hath conversed with country gentlemen must have heard, no one, I believe, hath ever seen a single instance where the desire hath been complied with; – a great instance of their want of politeness; for in town nothing can be more common than for the finest gentlemen to perform this ceremony every day to their superiors, without having that favour once requested of them. -- Henry Fielding, A History of Tom Jones (1749)



A people who will not rule themselves – who will not defend themselves, or one another – are nothing but serfs, and so they shall be treated.

The part which most stood out to me about this video was how nobody came to Dao’s defense.

A small, 69 year old Asian man is being beaten by uniformed thugs, and the only response was mewling; a people who cannot defend themselves, who rely upon the police to moderate every conflict in their personal lives, will be at an utter loss when those same police turn on them. If there’s one take-away from this situation, it is this: submit or bleed from the forehead. A people who will not rule themselves – who will not defend themselves, or one another – are nothing but serfs, and so they shall be treated. The current reaction is not a principled protest (the few who are principled were already protesting); it is nothing but the bleating whines of agitated rabbits, failing to comprehend that this was the system they’ve been asking for all along.Corporations, United Airlines, and the Open-Air Prison Planet - Stares at the World



Pop Quiz: When is a gun NOT loaded? Bueller? Bueller?

Man Shows Friend How His Gun's Safety Works By Blowing His Own Brains Out A 911 caller reported that his friend was holding the gun to his own head when he pulled the trigger and it discharged, said Officer Jimmy Pollozani, police spokesman.
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The Incoming Roar

Among the dead was Chris Richardson, an Englishman who worked in Sweden for the music-streaming service Spotify.
The people who create such billion-dollar boutique diversions assure us that they are the future, and that the likes of the Stockholm jihadist are momentary aberrations, freakish eruptions in the otherwise smooth progress to a world in which the seductive siren of the unending song can be piped directly into your cerebral cortex 24 hours a day. The killers of Stockholm, Petersburg and Alexandria are betting otherwise.... The toll of the dead in Stockholm numbered Maïlys Dereymaeker, the young mother of an 18-month-old baby: She'd worked as a psychologist at several Belgian migrant centers helping "refugees" whose asylum bids had been turned down. Her killer could have used her assistance: Rakhmat Akilov had had his application for Swedish asylum rejected last year, but the authorities couldn't be bothered to rouse themselves to deport him. She was, in a certain sense, on his side. But he killed her anyway, because that's not how he saw it. :: SteynOnline


Trump declares Mid East "Overbooked" with dictators, one has to go

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President Trump has announced that he will pay Syrian dictator and mass murderer Bashar Assad $800 to leave Syria and wait for another dictatorship to become available later.Sense of Events:

If It's Worth Doing, It's Worth Overdoing

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The Bulgari Ginza Tower houses the luxury brand's chocolate specialty store, the BULGARI Il Cioccolato, on the 10th floor,
and that's where we got our hands on a very special 6,000-yen (US$55) chocolate Easter egg. The chocolate egg, called the Uovo di Pasqua (literally "Easter Egg"), was a limited edition item of which just 50 in total were sold at the Il Cioccolato shops in the Ginza Tower and the Matsuya Ginza Department Store. --| RocketNews24


"If you go down in the woods today / You'd better go in disguise"

I do my woods cruising "ghosting style"—a dozen steps, stop, repeat—without a backpack, I toted a rifle in .22 WMR, crank-action, topped with a low power scope. Sighted for ahunnerd yards with 40 grainers. Good for feeling dangerous. It carries well muzzle down. And a big ol' Schrade knife with a quarter-inch thick fixed blade sharpened to where its shadow alone will cut paper. My trusty Sunto wrist compass, natch. Around here compasses are like small town newspapers, people read 'em to make sure they got the facts right. North stayed just where it should be the whole time, a few degrees off the pointer. Check. - - If it's Tuesday it's a new Woodpile Report




Give Into Your Craving: It's National Grilled Cheese Day

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The ballpark classic of soft pretzels with mustard, and a favorite quick bite of Jarlsberg and hard pretzels, turned into a great grilled sandwich. It combines homemade pretzel rolls and mustard, and it’s worth the extra effort. Get our Sweet Hot Mustard and Jarlsberg Grilled Cheese recipe. -- Chowhound

10 Terms to Be Used by United Airlines Personnel When Addressing the Public

10. Unscheduled Equipment Retirement (crash) “United regrets to announce that Flight 80 from Boston to Las Vegas experienced an unscheduled equipment retirement. As soon as our United crew reaches the flight’s bonus destination, we will announce how many passengers, if any, we will re-accommodate.” - McSweeney’s

The Swedish Solution: Raped, Cucked, Fucked, Killed, and Happy to Limit the Use of Cars. Fondue Forks Next.

It's The Perfect PC-Storm. From now on any Swedes killed by Muslims can thank all their fellow Swedes who made it possible over and over and over and over and over again. 'Ban Cars to Stop Terror' Says Sweden's Best-Selling Newspaper After Stockholm Attack

Say "Ahhh..... just kill me now."

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13,000-Year-Old Fillings Were 'Drilled' With Stone and Packed With Tar The new study focuses on two of the incisors,
which contain marks that suggest a pointed instrument, likely a stone, was used to enlarge cavities in the teeth and scrape out decayed tissue. The Neolithic dentist then seemed to stick dark bits of bitumen—a type of naturally occurring tar that Ice Age people used to waterproof baskets and pots—to the walls of the cavity. The researchers also found bits of hair and plant fibers stuck in the bitumen, though they are not sure what purpose they served.


Cannonballs and bayonet charges are terrible things,

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but they pale in comparison to massed machine gun fire on advancing infantry.
It would seem blazingly obvious that unless you have an answer for the machine gun, much less the new artillery, you don’t willingly go to war. That’s not what happened. Two great industrial wars latter and the West was just about dead..... It’s fun to speculate, but flying death robots alone change the way the world will be fighting wars in the future. Things like carriers can quickly become white elephants in a world where a swarm or drones can fall out of the sky or come up from the depths of the ocean. Everyone forgets about the coming proliferation of a independently controlled torpedoes that can literally roam the ocean looking for targets. The microprocessor goes from being a force multiplier to a force nullifier. - - The New Ways Of War


Torn From the Virtual Pages of the Maine Craigslist

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Mainers are incapable of projecting the false front of bonhomie that blarney requires.
They are bereft of whimsy. This Maine Craigslist Cultural Encyclopedia is a great example of the heartfelt sincerity of the place. There is nothing ironic in the Maine Craigslist. Or more accurately, there is nothing deliberately ironic. It's refreshing to live in a place where you are what you is, as they say. - - Sippican Cottage:


Your Appalachian medical lesson of the day. Use it wisely.

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Keep a sealed bottle of real vanilla in your first aid kit as a dental pain reliever.
If not sealed it will evaporate over time and if you have ever had tooth pain you'll appreciate the suggestion. Uncap the bottle, remove the seal, hold a tightly wadded paper towel over the opening and turn it upside down for a moment saturating it. Then quickly hold that wad tight against the painful tooth for a full minute. Within 10 seconds the pain will completely disappear.... While eating a hard shell taco an upper molar snapped off at the gum line. I didn't know there was a problem with it beforehand. The pain was instant, overwhelming, and went all the way up into my eye and forehead. If a gun was at hand I might have used it. It was THAT bad. Then I remembered a passage in Foxfire 1 and ran for the vanilla. In a way it saved my life. Posted by: ghostsniper.


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