The Mountain of the Holy Cross: "First there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is."

A beautiful story that I had never heard before. Thank you for sharing it, amigo. You have a good heart and kind and gentle spirit. May the Good Lord bless and keep you in the new year!

Kurt

Posted by Kurt at December 30, 2009 11:27 PM

I have seen it. Many years ago, from the top of Vail mountain as we were ready to begin the descent into the back bowls. I can still see it in my mind's eye.

Posted by RagnarD at December 31, 2009 12:07 AM

What a wonderful post. Thank you.

Posted by GW at December 31, 2009 2:28 AM

Inspirational and beautiful. Thank you for the beautiful pictures and great story.

Posted by Cilla Mitchell, Galveston, Texas at December 31, 2009 5:24 AM

Hey! It's snow. Get over it.

Posted by Kazooskibum at December 31, 2009 6:40 AM

...so you are upset that 100 years ago people deluded themselves into assigning significance to this rock formation and now they don't? Your post is a perfect example of why there can be no conversation over religion; there is no logic, only emotion. People believe and see what they want because it gives them emotional comfort.

Posted by Barnabus at December 31, 2009 6:43 AM

Did they delude themselves then or now? You don't have to get so emotional about it even though it discomforts you. It is somewhat more complicated than that and might be read more closely.

15 He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.

16 But whereunto shall I liken this generation? It is like unto children sitting in the markets, and calling unto their fellows,

-- Matthew 11

Posted by vanderleun at December 31, 2009 7:03 AM

Beautiful piece.

Thank you.

Posted by Cathy at December 31, 2009 7:15 AM

Really enjoyed 'Mountain of the Holy Cross' and your reply to Barnabus - that was me 2.5 or so decades ago. BTW - doubt Barnabus is his real name. Already shared with over 100 other folks. Thanks!

Posted by RileyD, nwJ at December 31, 2009 7:53 AM

Thanks for sharing. Have a wonderful New Year!

Posted by Cliff at December 31, 2009 8:07 AM

Where did it go, our sense of wonder?

Thanks, Gerard, for another fascinating post. Happy New Year!

Posted by JBean at December 31, 2009 9:41 AM

Two girls, maybe in their early twenties, were standing there on Mountain of the Holy Cross, BUTT NAKED, with their arms in the air and their rear ends shining on the crowd as they flashed the Bowl of Tears Basin.

The God of Sacrifice and Transcendence is dead. Long live the Goddess of Narcissism and Flesh.

Posted by Aquila at December 31, 2009 12:52 PM

"He that hath ears to hear, let him hear." ...that can be used to justify any belief system, including global warming.

Posted by Barnabus at December 31, 2009 2:23 PM

"A miracle is a change in perception."

Posted by Charlie Martin at December 31, 2009 4:37 PM

By the way, Google Earth's photos were at a time that the cross is pretty clear:

39.466944, -106.481667

Posted by Charlie Martin at December 31, 2009 4:45 PM

A few years back, we took the California Zephyr train from Sacramento to Denver. In Glenwood Springs two Mennonite couples got on the train and for the most part, spent their time in the touring car. I talked with them for some time (feeling all the while that my shorts were far too short; I'm tall, so longer shorts still appear almost indecent.)

While we were paralleling the Colorado River, a group of rafters went by and one of them mooned us. The Mennonite gentleman next to me said they'd seen that on the way up too. "Big smile he has," he remarked. "On sideways, though."

Whenever I encounter mooning, I think of that gently humorous commentary on it.

Posted by B. Durbin at December 31, 2009 9:23 PM

When I started reading the article I was thinking of Constantine the Great, and when you wrote "In hoc signo vinces" I smiled*.

You were thinking the same thing.

*I have been re-reading Frank Slaughter's book.

Posted by Mikey NTH at January 1, 2010 9:20 AM

Obviously it looks like a cross, but the warrior in me also sees a mighty sword. Perhaps one belonging to one of the archangels. This might also explain why we are no loger privileged to see it, for it has been reclaimed by it's rightful owner. I fear his has great need for it right about now.

Great post, and thanks for sharing the beautiful artwork.

Posted by Guy S at December 28, 2010 5:39 PM

Gerard, another beautiful place I must see before I die.

Posted by Circe at December 28, 2010 7:26 PM

Loved this post and especially this line: "...that moment when the land was new"

Posted by Patty at January 2, 2011 7:44 PM

"He that hath ears to hear, let him hear." ...that can be used to justify any belief system, including global warming."

Oh, dry up. And try to be a little optimistic--maybe your next meal won't result in stomach cramps.

And a question--just how often do you think that your are able to put an end to someone's sense of wonder, or mystery, or their simple adherence to their own ways by gassing all over a comment section like this, Barnabus? Because never once have I met a person who was converted into someone like you via adolescent sneering.

Posted by Mike James at April 7, 2012 1:31 PM

I just read the posts about the Mt.of the HOLY CROSS. I grew up in the small town of Red Cliff,
CO. The Mt. of the HOLY CROSS has always been very special to me. If one were to take Shrine Pass from Red Cliff to now Highway 70 (towards Vail) there is a wonderful view of the Cross.
Also, a photographer, Si Ostemier,a geologist at the Empire Zinc Mine in Gilman CO and a photographer took a photo of the Cross in its orginal state. Photo is patented. During WWI when the 10th Mtn. Troops trained at Camp Hale in Pando, CO, the Cross's left side was badly damaged by the artillary fire.
Yet the Cross is still visible as a cross. Twice I have climbed the trail from Camp Tigiwan, near Minturn, to Notch Mountain only to feel the power of God in its beauty and glory. The cirque lake at the base of the Cross is the Bowl of Tears. For many years the devout had a Pilgrimage to the Cross. Some walked and other rode horses. This was part of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Minturn and Red Cliff though nonCatholics also joined the
pilgrimage. To me, the Cross is a very Blessed
Site. Shirley Mooers

Posted by Shirley Mooers at September 10, 2013 11:42 PM

I just read the posts about the Mt.of the HOLY CROSS. I grew up in the small town of Red Cliff,
CO. The Mt. of the HOLY CROSS has always been very special to me. If one were to take Shrine Pass from Red Cliff to now Highway 70 (towards Vail) there is a wonderful view of the Cross.

Also, a photographer, Si Ostemier,a geologist at the Empire Zinc Mine in Gilman CO and a photographer took a photo of the Cross in its orginal state. Photo is patented. During WWI when the 10th Mtn. Troops trained at Camp Hale in Pando, CO, the Cross's left side was badly damaged by the artillary fire.

Yet the Cross is still visible as a cross. Twice I have climbed the trail from Camp Tigiwan, near Minturn, to Notch Mountain only to feel the power of God in its beauty and glory. The cirque lake at the base of the Cross is the Bowl of Tears. For many years the devout had a Pilgrimage to the Cross. Some walked and other rode horses. This was part of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Minturn and Red Cliff though nonCatholics also joined the
pilgrimage. To me, the Cross is a very Blessed
Site.

Shirley Mooers

Posted by Shirley Mooers at September 10, 2013 11:45 PM

Thank you, Ms. Mooers, for your extended and interesting commentary.

Posted by vanderleun at September 11, 2013 8:21 AM

Thank you for this, dear Gerard. It is the marvelous piece.

Posted by Manolo the Shoeblogger at April 19, 2014 10:45 AM

In hoc signo vinces...the motto of all Sigma Chi members!

Posted by Roger at April 20, 2014 10:26 AM
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